New Process NP205

NP205 Transfer Case Specs & Ratios

The NP205 transfer case is one of the most sought after and stout transfer cases ever offered in a pickup application. A single piece cast iron case body and helical cut gears contributed to its strength. The case was used by the Big 3 - Ford, Dodge, and General Motors - in various 1969 to 1993 model year pickups. A number of variations have been used, in particular because the three automakers required different mounting patterns and options.

While Dodge and GM offered the transfer case "married" to the transmission, Ford offered a divorced version from 1972 to 1977. Because of the units success and popularity, rebuild kits are easy to come by and relatively affordable. Being a part time, gear driven unit, the NP205 is favored to the full time chain driven NP203. The NP205 was traditionally used behind manual transmissions, while the NP203 was reserved for automatic transmission applications of the same period (with many exceptions). The NP205 is a favorite amongst off-roaders, despite its most notable downfall being the relatively tall low range gear ratio.

 

New Process NP205 Specs

Manufacturer:

New Process Gear

Applications:

• 1969 - 1993 Dodge pickups (including 89-93 Cummins)
• 1972 - 1979 Ford pickup
• 1969 - 1980 GMC/Chevrolet pickups

Case:

Cast iron, 1 piece, married & divorced variations

Drive Type:

Part time, helical gear set, manual shift

Gear Ratios:

High Range

1.00 : 1 (direct drive)

Low Range

1.96 : 1

Fluid Type/Spec:

80 - 90w gear oil

Weight:

130 - 140 lbs dry

Identification:

Transfer case ID tag located on rear of case above driveshaft output shaft

 

The NP205 has been offered in a number of varieties, including various mounting types and spline counts. Ford offered the NP205 as both a married and divorced transfer case with 32 spline input/output shafts. Dodge and GM transfer cases were offered in a number of spline counts, a 10 or 30 spline input with 32 spline output being common configurations. GM and Dodge NP205 cases had the 4WD output shaft located on the passenger side, while Ford used a case with a driver side output.