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Ford Lion V-8 & V-6 DIesel

Possible F-150 Diesel Options

 

 

 

 

Ford Motor Company already has diesel powerplants that could be used in its Ford F-150. The engines, outlined below, are used in Europe where there is a high demand for efficient vehicles and consumers have embraced the benefits of diesel engines for years. While Ford has the resources and is likely in the best position to offer a diesel in their 1/2 ton F-150, the economic climate in the United States has yet to provide the stability necessary to fund & support the project. Ford has made it clear that they do not want to force a diesel engine option into their line up until they know for certain their is high demand for one. For now, they are focusing on their line of ultra efficient EcoBoost engines. With Ram and Nissan 1/2 ton diesels on the horizon, many suspect that Ford will have no choice but to enter the competition.

Ford 2.7L Lion V6

Configuration:

60 degree V6 diesel

Displacement:

2.7 liters, 166 cubic inches

Block/Head Material:

• Compact graphite iron (CGI) block.
• Cast aluminum cylinder heads.

Bore x Stroke:

3.19 inches x 3.47 inches

Injection:

Piezo injectors, high pressure common rail.

Aspiration:

• Twin variable geometry turbochargers (VGT)
and single variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) versions.
• Intercooler (air-to-air).

Emissions Equipment:

DPF, EGR, & SCR will likely be required to meet U.S. emissions requirements.

Valvetrain:

24 valve dual overhead camshaft (DOHC).

Horsepower:

Approx. 207 hp @ 4,000 RPM

Torque:

Approx. 320 lb-ft. @ 1,900 RPM

Fuel Economy:

N/A

 

Ford 3.6L Lion V8

Configuration:

60 degree V8 diesel

Displacement:

3.6 liters, 222 cubic inches.

Block/Head Material:

• Compact graphite iron (CGI) block.
• Cast aluminum cylinder heads.

Bore x Stroke:

3.19 inches x 3.47 inches.

Injection:

Piezo injectors, high pressure common rail.

Aspiration:

• Twin variable geometry turbochargers (VGT).
• Intercooler (air-to-air).

Emissions Equipment:

Possible DPF, SCR, EGR, & catalytic converter to meet U.S. emissions requirements.

Valvetrain:

32 valve dual overhead camshaft (DOHC).

Horsepower:

Approx. 272 hp @ 4,000 RPM

Torque:

Approx. 472 lb-ft. @ 1,900 RPM

Fuel Economy:

N/A

Possible Applications:

Ford F-150, Ford Expedition, Ford Explorer

 

Ford 4.4L Lion V8

Configuration:

60 degree V8 diesel

Displacement:

4.4 liters, 296 cubic inches

Block/Head Material:

• Compact graphite iron (CGI) block.
• Cast aluminum cylinder heads.

Bore x Stroke:

3.19 inches x 4.63 inches

Injection:

Piezo injectors, high pressure common rail.

Aspiration:

• Twin variable geometry turbochargers (VGT).
• Intercooler (air-to-air).

Emissions Equipment:

• Diesel particulate filter (DPF).
• Selective catalytic reduction (SCR; Urea injection).
• Catalytic converter.

Valvetrain:

32 valve dual overhead camshaft (DOHC).

Horsepower:

Approx. 325 hp @ 4,000 RPM

Torque:

Approx. 515 lb-ft. @ 1,900 RPM

Fuel Economy:

20% improvement over 5.4L gas engine in Ford
F-150.

Possible Applications:

Ford F-150, Ford Expedition

 

Ford's family of Lion diesel engines are all based on the same general engine architecture and were designed in conjuction with PSA Peugeot. All the engines are turbocharged, and in some cases twin-turbocharged. Compact graphite iron (CGI) blocks and aluminum cylinder heads keep the engine weight down, making them ideal candidates for use in light pickups like the Ford F-150, as well as smaller SUVs and sedans. The 2.7L Lion V6 has been recorded delivering fuel mileage as high as 49 mpg highway and 27 mpg city, proving that the engines can deliver hybrid-like fuel economy without sacrificing performance. The engines are currently offered in Jaguar, PSA Peugeot, & Land Rover vehicles. The 4.4L Lion V8 is responsible for a lawsuit between Navistar/International and Ford Motor Company, in which Navistar claimed that it was their engineers who came up with idea of increasing the stroke of the 3.6L to build the 4.4L. Navistar claimed breach of contract when Ford decided to produce the engine without their support.